La Carolina, España, 1958

Adela Muñoz Páez is a professor of inorganic chemistry at the University of Seville. Her investigative work has been documented in almost 100 articles in international specialist science journals and in numerous articles to disseminate scientific knowledge in the press.

Bibliography

The hidden story of Marie Curie, the mother of modern physics. 

Admired after being awarded her first Nobel Prize, commiserated after the death of Pierre Curie and fiercely attacked after the Langevin scandal, she was both revered in her native Poland, acclaimed by the Americans and the French for the development of radiotherapy, and undervalued by some scientists because of her status as a woman. 

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Non-fiction

The hidden story of Marie Curie, the mother of modern physics. Who was Maria Sklodowska Curie? A great scientist or an ambitious woman who took advantage of her husband's talent? A mass idol or a pathologically introverted person? A selfless wife or a passionate lover who destroyed a family?

Admired after being awarded her first Nobel Prize, commiserated after the death of Pierre Curie and fiercely attacked after the Langevin scandal, she was both revered in her native Poland, acclaimed by the Americans and the French for the development of radiotherapy, and undervalued by some scientists because of her status as a woman. Marie Curie has been recognized in history as the discoverer of radioactivity, a phenomenon on the frontier between physics and chemistry that revolutionized science. She was a jealous defender of her discoveries, but at the same time so detached that she did not patent any. Although her mother tongue was Polish, she studied in Russian, celebrated her marriage in French and delivered her most important speeches in English. However, polyglot and cosmopolitan as she was, she never lost her Polish identity. She named the first chemical element she discovered, polonium, after her native country. Nature lover, she walked through the mountains, swam in the seas and toured her life riding a bicycle. She worked, loved and lived passionately until the glow of the radio she had discovered stole her last breath.

https://www.megustaleer.com/libros/marie-curie/MES-110444#

 

A fascinating journey through the history of women in science. A just rediscovery of forgotten women.

Who was Enheduanna? And Émilie de Châtelet? Why do master brewers consider Hildegard of Bingen, an 11th century nun, their mentor? Did Marie Curie deserve the two Nobel Prizes for Science that she received? Would it have been possible to decipher the structure of DNA without the work of Rosalind Franklin? Why is the woman who unravelled the structure of penicillin so unknown? What role did women play in the Silver Age of Science during Spain’s Second Republic?

In this book, Adela Muñoz Páez rescues the history of some women who made relevant contributions to science. At the same time, she travels through history to explore why there were so few of them, and why they’re so unknown today.

Interview, La Contra, La Vanguardia, 03-03-17

TV Interview, Para Todos, La 2, RTVE, 26-03-17

'Heroínas olvidadas: científicas de la II República', Adela Muñoz, El País, 11-02-17

TV Interview, Canal Sur, marzo 2017

Review by Sandra Ferrer, febrero 2017 

Obra divulgativa sobre Marie Curie dentro de una colección de libros única, rigurosa y didáctica, para conocer las teorías que explican el mundo a través de la vida de los científicos que las descubrieron.

Obra divulgativa sobre Antoine Lavoisier dentro de una colección de libros única, rigurosa y didáctica, para conocer las teorías que explican el mundo a través de la vida de los científicos que las descubrieron.

Una reflexión necesaria sobre la eutanasia y las implicaciones morales y legales de luchar por una muerte digna. La muerte sigue siendo un tema tabú en las sociedades occidentales, una cuestión que entendemos que está fuera de nuestras manos. En consecuencia, la eutanasia, el derecho de cada uno a decidir sobre su propia muerte, es uno de los debates más controvertidos pero también más necesarios de nuestros días. Adela Muñoz Páez expone casos reales y explica cuáles son sus implicaciones científicas, morales y legales.

The use of poison as a weapon of power dates back to the origins of history. Emperors, kings, pharaohs, plebeians and courtiers, lovers and spies, have all been victims and beneficiaries of the effects of these substances, which are as deadly as they are discreet and fascinating.

Touching on the most celebrated poisonings in history –Socrates, Cleopatra, Lucrezia Borgia,Rasputin, Hitler…–, Adela Muñoz Páez, Professor of Inorganic Chemistry at the University of Seville, provides a riveting history of poisons. These range from the most familiar, such as hemlock and arsenic, to the most modern and sophisticated, such as thallium and polonium.

Prizes

  • 2017 - Premio Equitat de la Universitat Oberta de Catalunya por su proyecto de teatro con el grupo P5C: "Científicas: pasado, presente y futuro", dirigido a estudiantes de primaria y secundaria.
  • 2015 - Premio Meridiana (Instituto de la Mujer de la Junta de Andalucía). Mención especial del jurado, por su trayectoria profesional y personal.
  • 2008 - Accésit del Premio de Divulgación Feminista Carmen de Burgos por su artículo "Que no estén solas".